Posts Tagged ‘habitat’

Sammy Seal Talks with Pete Polar Bear about the 1% that Really Counts!

Hi, Sammy Seal here! A while back, I had the pleasure of making a few comments on this blog about what’s going on where I live, down on the Antarctic Peninsula. You can check me out, Sammy the Leopard Seal’s Report from Antarctica. You may recall I talked about some conversations I overheard regarding global […]


The Happy Plight of the Obese Marmot and Other Tales

In our recent blog discussions, we’ve pointed out that wildlife, challenged by global warming, is moving to more northern latitudes, and when they can, further up the slopes of mountains. The species range-shift, as it is called by scientists, is occurring far more rapidly than originally projected. With the warming changes, migrations also hear a […]


Where All the Vultures Aren’t Pretty!

I don’t listen to a lot of radio, but there is one program I really like, Garrison Keeler’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” with its gentle, tongue in cheek, spoof about “Lake Wobegon Days” — life in fictional Lake Wobegon, Minnesota, examined by a twinkling eye through glasses rimmed with good old-fashioned, mid-west values. Lake Wobegon […]


Disappearing Florida – Squeeze on the Swamp

Deep in the bald cypress forest of the Corkscrew Swamp in South Florida is Lettuce Lake. Its surface is covered with a mat of soft green floating vegetation known as “water lettuce.” The water lettuce provides shelter for crayfish, small fish, small reptiles, and amphibians and provides food for turtles and a vast variety of […]


Disappearing Florida – The Invaders

One of the early blogs I posted on this site was posted after a Florida Naturalist field trip within the St. Martins’ Preserve. I had heard about “invasive species” of plants and animals, but what I heard went in one ear and out the other. After the November 2009 field trip, I wrote the blog, […]


Disappearing Florida – The Eagle Has Landed!

Not all of the environmental information coming from Florida is discouraging. We do have an ecological success story! Our National Emblem, the Bald Eagle. After almost 40 years of concerted conservation efforts, the Eagle Has Landed! The Bald Eagle is the only eagle that is unique to North America. About half of the Bald Eagles […]


Disappearing Florida – Birds of a Feather Disappear Together

There’s something special about wading birds, like the Herons and the Egrets (members of the same specie family). Elegant, graceful, poetic in flight. And then there’s their feathers. Ken Burns, in his National Park PBS series and DVD provides telling information about our fashionable ladies’ quest for Egret and Heron feathers for their bonnets around […]


Disappearing Florida – Coastal Hammocks

Unlike most of the photos we’ve featured in our blog, the picture above has not been included for its beauty. The dead red cedars were once part of a thriving “island hammock” – a tree-filled bit of high ground protruding above the high-tide line on a coastal salt marsh; in this case, on the Withlacoochee […]


Disappearing Florida – the Brown Pelican

Living on a Florida coastal island, as we do, it’s hard to image that the Brown Pelican is an endangered specie. These awkward looking waterbirds, with wing spans up to seven feet, yellow heads, brown bodies, and suitcase-like beaks were nearly wiped out in the early 1900s by Gulf fishermen who slaughtered them, claiming they […]


Rosy Fingers of Dawn on a Fragile Day

According to ancient Greek legend, each morning Eos, the goddess of dawn, rose from her home at the edge of Oceanus, the ocean that surrounds the world, to herald her brother Helios, the sun. Homer’s Iliad immortalized the legend by opening each epic, unspoiled day by a gentle turn from Eos’s rosy fingers of dawn. […]


A Growing "Photo Op"!

Deserts are fascinating places for photographers. Deserts are filled with geometry – lines and curves, shaped by shadows and sweeping mountains of sand interspersed with dead trees and empty riverbeds, populated by unusual wildlife. Early on, as I developed my interest in photography, I bought a Brett Weston desert landscape, “Dune California.” In the mid […]


Did the Wrong “Cat“ Take Over the Swamp?

This is a tale about two big cats. Big cats are “territorial,” like nearly all other of our Creator’s creatures. Robert Ardrey, in his 1966 classic, The Territorial Imperative, defines “territory” as an area of space, which an animal or group of animals defends as an exclusive preserve. Most species defend territory only against animals […]


"Leave Only Footprints" – an Old Adage revisited!

There’s an old adage, cautiously followed by nature photographers and environmentalists worldwide. It’s “Take only pictures, leave only footprints.” As wise as that admonition is in environmentally sensitive areas, it has its limitations. Let’s consider the Pampas of Argentina as an example. Today, the Pampas are considered one of the most environmentally endangered habitats on […]


Plato was Right!

Plato once said that the “aim of all education is to teach us to love beauty.” Travel can be a vital part of that education. When we explore the amazing mystery of our planet, we become connected, in harmony – and we learn to love its beauty. Through our photographs we can capture a few […]


Holding its Own?

The world’s third largest reservoir of fresh water is in the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, located in the Andes, shared with Argentina and Chile. Like the glaciers in the Himalayas and throughout the rest of the world, the Patagonian Ice Field glaciers are also retreating, raising serious concerns about future fresh-water availability in that part […]


92,500 Down, 7,500 to Go – But Who's Counting?

The Cheetah is the oldest of the big cats, going back some 3 million years. 20,000 years ago Cheetahs were common throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, including North America as well as Asia, Europe and Africa. Sumerian princes and noblemen kept Cheetahs as pets and used them to hunt, much as hunting dogs are […]


So, How Do We Share Our Earth’s Precious Resources?

There’s an interesting quiz on the Global Footprint webpage. You answer a few questions and it calculates how you use the earth’s resources. My score indicates that if each person on earth used resources as I do, we would need 4.3 earths to support our global population. That’s scary, but pretty good, actually. Americans on […]