Posts Tagged ‘gaia’

Artifacts – What Does Their Destruction Mean to Us?

The recent destruction of ancient artifacts in the Middle East by ISIS has painfully reminded us of an all too frequent repeating story of our globe’s plundering conquerors. ISIS is but a current version of a long history of plunderers. Destruction of archeological sites, ancient works of art and other creations of the conquered validate […]


Why the Puffins Keep “Puffin'” and Other Lessons from Gjesvaerstappan

In mid-June 2013, we traveled to a fishing village, Gjesvaer, high up on the northwest coast of Norway, far above the Arctic Circle. There we boarded a small boat to take us Gjesvaerstappan, a series of small islands, breeding colonies for thousands of birds, located about 15 km from the Nord Kapp (North Cape) on […]


Gone Fishin’ – Getting “Unplugged” in the Real World

The February 2011 issue of the Smithsonian includes an “Interview” with Jane McGonigal, a computer game developer from San Francisco. The theme of the interview is that computer games can make people smarter and help humanity. The games Ms. McGonigal develop take place in a virtual reality, but are designed to encourage players to action […]


Disappearing Florida – Sunrise or Sunset?

There’s something special about our island, Tierra Verde, on Florida’s Gulf Coast. Living here is like being on a perpetual vacation in one of Gaia’s most beautiful places. Centuries ago, when native Americans settled this part of the globe, and the seas were much lower (about 120 meters lower – see our blog Abrupt Change […]


Some “Bugs” that “Bear” Fixing

The winter of 2010 is going to be a tough winter for the bears in Yellowstone – and for a number of the Park’s visitors. There’s a shortage of whitebark pine cones, a favorite bear food. Bears like to load up on the pine cones before they hibernate for the long winter. But in recent […]


Rosy Fingers of Dawn on a Fragile Day

According to ancient Greek legend, each morning Eos, the goddess of dawn, rose from her home at the edge of Oceanus, the ocean that surrounds the world, to herald her brother Helios, the sun. Homer’s Iliad immortalized the legend by opening each epic, unspoiled day by a gentle turn from Eos’s rosy fingers of dawn. […]


“I Think That I Shall Never See …”

When I was in the 6th grade, my teacher thought we should become familiar with poetry. My assignment, learn and recite “Trees,” Joyce Kilmer‘s 1912 poem, written a few years before he died during World War I. The poem went like this: I think that I shall never see A poem lovely as a tree. […]


"Leave Only Footprints" – an Old Adage revisited!

There’s an old adage, cautiously followed by nature photographers and environmentalists worldwide. It’s “Take only pictures, leave only footprints.” As wise as that admonition is in environmentally sensitive areas, it has its limitations. Let’s consider the Pampas of Argentina as an example. Today, the Pampas are considered one of the most environmentally endangered habitats on […]


Plato was Right!

Plato once said that the “aim of all education is to teach us to love beauty.” Travel can be a vital part of that education. When we explore the amazing mystery of our planet, we become connected, in harmony – and we learn to love its beauty. Through our photographs we can capture a few […]


92,500 Down, 7,500 to Go – But Who's Counting?

The Cheetah is the oldest of the big cats, going back some 3 million years. 20,000 years ago Cheetahs were common throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, including North America as well as Asia, Europe and Africa. Sumerian princes and noblemen kept Cheetahs as pets and used them to hunt, much as hunting dogs are […]


So, How Do We Share Our Earth’s Precious Resources?

There’s an interesting quiz on the Global Footprint webpage. You answer a few questions and it calculates how you use the earth’s resources. My score indicates that if each person on earth used resources as I do, we would need 4.3 earths to support our global population. That’s scary, but pretty good, actually. Americans on […]