Posts Tagged ‘Florida’

What (Each Coastal State) Needs: A Tax Policy That Works With Sea Level RIse

This blog’s video – 27 minutes – is my recent talk before the Florida Bar Tax Section. I was Florida’s Tax Section Chair in the mid-1970s. A lot has happened since then. I “retired.” I trekked the seven continents. Our climate’s warming. Our seas are rising. And, after a lot of “wet-feet, dirty-hands” trekking-learning, I […]


Astronaut Edgar Mitchell’s Final Advice for Our Politicians

On Sunday, April 3, 2016, I was privileged to give a talk at a special tribute to Astronaut Edgar Mitchell, who died February 4, 2016, one day before the 45th anniversary of his Apollo 14 Moon Walk. The tribute was held in St. Petersburg by the local community of members of the Institute of Noetic […]


What happens when the “fresh waters” aren’t so fresh any more?

There’s a problem on North Carolina’s coastlines. Despite denials of climate change and warming and allegations of “hoax” from several Congressmen and Presidential Candidates, the seas, largely stable for the past 5,000 years, are rising and Carolina’s coastline is in retreat. Three islands are now submerged. The rising seas, exacerbated by melting glaciers, are flooding […]


Getting the Kids Ready for the Competition: Our Investment in Educating Joey

The kangaroo young are called “Joey” – whether male or female. For our young, its’ a little different. It used to be Dick and Jane. Today, we’re a little fancier. In our clan our young are Zach and Jett and Eva. But whether we’re kangaroos or humans, our responsibilities are the same: raise ‘em, protect […]


Did the Wrong Cat Take Over the Swamp?

This is a tale about two big cats. Big cats are “territorial,” like nearly all other of our Creator’s creatures. Robert Ardrey, in his 1966 classic, The Territorial Imperative, defines “territory” as an area of space, which an animal or group of animals defends as an exclusive preserve. Most species defend territory only against animals […]


Disappearing Florida – Sunrise or Sunset?

There’s something special about our island, Tierra Verde, on Florida’s Gulf Coast. Living here is like being on a perpetual vacation in one of Gaia’s most beautiful places. Centuries ago, when native Americans settled this part of the globe, and the seas were much lower (about 120 meters lower – see our blog Abrupt Change […]


Disappearing Florida – Squeeze on the Swamp

Deep in the bald cypress forest of the Corkscrew Swamp in South Florida is Lettuce Lake. Its surface is covered with a mat of soft green floating vegetation known as “water lettuce.” The water lettuce provides shelter for crayfish, small fish, small reptiles, and amphibians and provides food for turtles and a vast variety of […]


Disappearing Florida – The Invaders

One of the early blogs I posted on this site was posted after a Florida Naturalist field trip within the St. Martins’ Preserve. I had heard about “invasive species” of plants and animals, but what I heard went in one ear and out the other. After the November 2009 field trip, I wrote the blog, […]


Disappearing Florida – The Eagle Has Landed!

Not all of the environmental information coming from Florida is discouraging. We do have an ecological success story! Our National Emblem, the Bald Eagle. After almost 40 years of concerted conservation efforts, the Eagle Has Landed! The Bald Eagle is the only eagle that is unique to North America. About half of the Bald Eagles […]


Disappearing Florida – Salt of Our Earth

Florida’s beaches are fascinating. On its East Coast sandy beaches are shaped by the merciless pounding from the Atlantic’s waves. These beaches are “high energy” beaches. In contrast, on the West Coast from about Citrus County north, around the bend to Apalachicola Bay, the coastal wetlands are “low energy“ landforms, without the pounding waves and […]


Disappearing Florida – Birds of a Feather Disappear Together

There’s something special about wading birds, like the Herons and the Egrets (members of the same specie family). Elegant, graceful, poetic in flight. And then there’s their feathers. Ken Burns, in his National Park PBS series and DVD provides telling information about our fashionable ladies’ quest for Egret and Heron feathers for their bonnets around […]


Disappearing Florida – Sea Life, from Turtles to Coral Reefs

Sea Life and Coral[/caption] Florida has the richest concentration of reptiles, sea turtles and other amphibians of any state. Sea turtles can live to be a 100 years old. However, they have a weakness. They lay their eggs – 50-200 at a time – in nests dug among beach dunes, far inland from the waters […]


Disappearing Florida – Coastal Hammocks

Unlike most of the photos we’ve featured in our blog, the picture above has not been included for its beauty. The dead red cedars were once part of a thriving “island hammock” – a tree-filled bit of high ground protruding above the high-tide line on a coastal salt marsh; in this case, on the Withlacoochee […]


Disappearing Florida – the Florida Panther

In April 2010, we published a blog titled “Did the wrong Cat take over the swamp?“ Our story was about the destructive, encroaching pressures put on the Everglades by urban growth, resulting not only in the loss of some of Florida’s most pristine wilderness, but also of the habitat of the Florida Panther. We wrote: […]


Disappearing Florida – the Brown Pelican

Living on a Florida coastal island, as we do, it’s hard to image that the Brown Pelican is an endangered specie. These awkward looking waterbirds, with wing spans up to seven feet, yellow heads, brown bodies, and suitcase-like beaks were nearly wiped out in the early 1900s by Gulf fishermen who slaughtered them, claiming they […]


Rosy Fingers of Dawn on a Fragile Day

According to ancient Greek legend, each morning Eos, the goddess of dawn, rose from her home at the edge of Oceanus, the ocean that surrounds the world, to herald her brother Helios, the sun. Homer’s Iliad immortalized the legend by opening each epic, unspoiled day by a gentle turn from Eos’s rosy fingers of dawn. […]


Did the Wrong “Cat“ Take Over the Swamp?

This is a tale about two big cats. Big cats are “territorial,” like nearly all other of our Creator’s creatures. Robert Ardrey, in his 1966 classic, The Territorial Imperative, defines “territory” as an area of space, which an animal or group of animals defends as an exclusive preserve. Most species defend territory only against animals […]


92,500 Down, 7,500 to Go – But Who's Counting?

The Cheetah is the oldest of the big cats, going back some 3 million years. 20,000 years ago Cheetahs were common throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, including North America as well as Asia, Europe and Africa. Sumerian princes and noblemen kept Cheetahs as pets and used them to hunt, much as hunting dogs are […]