Posts Tagged ‘conservation’

The Happy Plight of the Obese Marmot and Other Tales

In our recent blog discussions, we’ve pointed out that wildlife, challenged by global warming, is moving to more northern latitudes, and when they can, further up the slopes of mountains. The species range-shift, as it is called by scientists, is occurring far more rapidly than originally projected. With the warming changes, migrations also hear a […]


Did the Wrong Cat Take Over the Swamp?

This is a tale about two big cats. Big cats are “territorial,” like nearly all other of our Creator’s creatures. Robert Ardrey, in his 1966 classic, The Territorial Imperative, defines “territory” as an area of space, which an animal or group of animals defends as an exclusive preserve. Most species defend territory only against animals […]


Disappearing Florida – Birds of a Feather Disappear Together

There’s something special about wading birds, like the Herons and the Egrets (members of the same specie family). Elegant, graceful, poetic in flight. And then there’s their feathers. Ken Burns, in his National Park PBS series and DVD provides telling information about our fashionable ladies’ quest for Egret and Heron feathers for their bonnets around […]


Disappearing Florida – Sea Life, from Turtles to Coral Reefs

Sea Life and Coral[/caption] Florida has the richest concentration of reptiles, sea turtles and other amphibians of any state. Sea turtles can live to be a 100 years old. However, they have a weakness. They lay their eggs – 50-200 at a time – in nests dug among beach dunes, far inland from the waters […]


Disappearing Florida – the Florida Panther

In April 2010, we published a blog titled “Did the wrong Cat take over the swamp?“ Our story was about the destructive, encroaching pressures put on the Everglades by urban growth, resulting not only in the loss of some of Florida’s most pristine wilderness, but also of the habitat of the Florida Panther. We wrote: […]


A Visit to Eden, A Thought from Thoreau – and a Lesson for the Photographer

After a visit to our April 2010 blog, “Did the Wrong CAT take Over the Swamp?” Peter, a good friend and fellow photographer, asked me, “Are you a Photographer turned Planeteer, or a Planeteer turned Photographer?” I chuckled, “I’m a Photographer turned Planeteer!” Peter responded. “Thought so!” It wasn’t long after that quick exchange that […]


Did the Wrong “Cat“ Take Over the Swamp?

This is a tale about two big cats. Big cats are “territorial,” like nearly all other of our Creator’s creatures. Robert Ardrey, in his 1966 classic, The Territorial Imperative, defines “territory” as an area of space, which an animal or group of animals defends as an exclusive preserve. Most species defend territory only against animals […]


What Happens When the Well Runs Dry?

It’s so easy for us in the United States to get a glass of water. It’s free at restaurants. At home or in the park, we simply turn on the spigot, and refresh ourselves. But most of our Gaia neighbors don’t have it so easy. The single biggest cause of premature death on our globe […]


"Leave Only Footprints" – an Old Adage revisited!

There’s an old adage, cautiously followed by nature photographers and environmentalists worldwide. It’s “Take only pictures, leave only footprints.” As wise as that admonition is in environmentally sensitive areas, it has its limitations. Let’s consider the Pampas of Argentina as an example. Today, the Pampas are considered one of the most environmentally endangered habitats on […]


Holding its Own?

The world’s third largest reservoir of fresh water is in the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, located in the Andes, shared with Argentina and Chile. Like the glaciers in the Himalayas and throughout the rest of the world, the Patagonian Ice Field glaciers are also retreating, raising serious concerns about future fresh-water availability in that part […]


92,500 Down, 7,500 to Go – But Who's Counting?

The Cheetah is the oldest of the big cats, going back some 3 million years. 20,000 years ago Cheetahs were common throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, including North America as well as Asia, Europe and Africa. Sumerian princes and noblemen kept Cheetahs as pets and used them to hunt, much as hunting dogs are […]


So, How Do We Share Our Earth’s Precious Resources?

There’s an interesting quiz on the Global Footprint webpage. You answer a few questions and it calculates how you use the earth’s resources. My score indicates that if each person on earth used resources as I do, we would need 4.3 earths to support our global population. That’s scary, but pretty good, actually. Americans on […]