Posts Tagged ‘climate’

How Green is My Arctic?

A provocative visual story needs very few comments by way of introduction. This is one of them. Scientists call it “range-shift migration.” It’s happening all over the world in many different ways. When mackerel moved from Scottish waters to Iceland, and Iceland wouldn’t let the Scottish fisherman follow it almost led to war, and remains […]


The Happy Plight of the Obese Marmot and Other Tales

In our recent blog discussions, we’ve pointed out that wildlife, challenged by global warming, is moving to more northern latitudes, and when they can, further up the slopes of mountains. The species range-shift, as it is called by scientists, is occurring far more rapidly than originally projected. With the warming changes, migrations also hear a […]


Is the Navy Getting it Right this Time?

I was ten years old, walking down Fifth Street on my way home, in Superior, Wisconsin on December 7, 1941, when the Japanese Navy launched its surprise attack on the United States Navy at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. A friend shouted the news to me from his porch. The attack, by 353 Japanese planes launched from […]


Where All the Vultures Aren’t Pretty!

I don’t listen to a lot of radio, but there is one program I really like, Garrison Keeler’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” with its gentle, tongue in cheek, spoof about “Lake Wobegon Days” — life in fictional Lake Wobegon, Minnesota, examined by a twinkling eye through glasses rimmed with good old-fashioned, mid-west values. Lake Wobegon […]


Disappearing Florida – Sunrise or Sunset?

There’s something special about our island, Tierra Verde, on Florida’s Gulf Coast. Living here is like being on a perpetual vacation in one of Gaia’s most beautiful places. Centuries ago, when native Americans settled this part of the globe, and the seas were much lower (about 120 meters lower – see our blog Abrupt Change […]


Disappearing Florida – Coastal Hammocks

Unlike most of the photos we’ve featured in our blog, the picture above has not been included for its beauty. The dead red cedars were once part of a thriving “island hammock” – a tree-filled bit of high ground protruding above the high-tide line on a coastal salt marsh; in this case, on the Withlacoochee […]


Abrupt Change. The Legend of the Dreamcatcher. It’s a Bug’s Life!

On September 8, 2010, I was a guest on the web station, BBS 1 Radio, Conversations with Mary Keene. The conversation was about living through crisis, based on my 1991 book, Crash Landing – Surviving a Business Crisis. The conversation was recorded for your listening. The book is about lessons learned during the early 1980s, […]


Some “Bugs” that “Bear” Fixing

The winter of 2010 is going to be a tough winter for the bears in Yellowstone – and for a number of the Park’s visitors. There’s a shortage of whitebark pine cones, a favorite bear food. Bears like to load up on the pine cones before they hibernate for the long winter. But in recent […]


Rosy Fingers of Dawn on a Fragile Day

According to ancient Greek legend, each morning Eos, the goddess of dawn, rose from her home at the edge of Oceanus, the ocean that surrounds the world, to herald her brother Helios, the sun. Homer’s Iliad immortalized the legend by opening each epic, unspoiled day by a gentle turn from Eos’s rosy fingers of dawn. […]


A Visit to Eden, A Thought from Thoreau – and a Lesson for the Photographer

After a visit to our April 2010 blog, “Did the Wrong CAT take Over the Swamp?” Peter, a good friend and fellow photographer, asked me, “Are you a Photographer turned Planeteer, or a Planeteer turned Photographer?” I chuckled, “I’m a Photographer turned Planeteer!” Peter responded. “Thought so!” It wasn’t long after that quick exchange that […]


What Happens When the Well Runs Dry?

It’s so easy for us in the United States to get a glass of water. It’s free at restaurants. At home or in the park, we simply turn on the spigot, and refresh ourselves. But most of our Gaia neighbors don’t have it so easy. The single biggest cause of premature death on our globe […]


Plato was Right!

Plato once said that the “aim of all education is to teach us to love beauty.” Travel can be a vital part of that education. When we explore the amazing mystery of our planet, we become connected, in harmony – and we learn to love its beauty. Through our photographs we can capture a few […]


Holding its Own?

The world’s third largest reservoir of fresh water is in the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, located in the Andes, shared with Argentina and Chile. Like the glaciers in the Himalayas and throughout the rest of the world, the Patagonian Ice Field glaciers are also retreating, raising serious concerns about future fresh-water availability in that part […]


So, How Do We Share Our Earth’s Precious Resources?

There’s an interesting quiz on the Global Footprint webpage. You answer a few questions and it calculates how you use the earth’s resources. My score indicates that if each person on earth used resources as I do, we would need 4.3 earths to support our global population. That’s scary, but pretty good, actually. Americans on […]